POLICE REFORM IN GEORGIA

Authors

  • Alexander Kupatadze

Abstract

This paper analyses the trajectory of post-Rose Revolution transition in the criminal justice system of Georgia and the way in which the rule of law has been undermined for the sake of building a strong state. The achievements and shortcomings of Georgian police reform are discussed and it is argued that the reforms have mainly targeted ‘low policing’ in order to meet the key concerns of the citizenry while ‘high policing’ remained above the law and a crucial safeguard for the ruling regime. The paper demonstrates that over the long term the anti-crime policies may have been failing and the zero-tolerance policy and prison experience of delinquents could have contributed in the displacement of the crime problem to the future.

Author Biography

Alexander Kupatadze

Alexander Kupatadze is a scholar with numerous years of experience in studying organized crime and corruption issues in post-Soviet Eurasia. He obtained his PhD in International Relations from the University of St Andrews, UK and has held teaching and research positions at the Transnational Crime and Corruption Center (TraCCC), Georgian Institute of Public Affairs in Tbilisi, Georgia, OSCE academy of Central Asia in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, and Elliott School of International Affairs of George Washington University, USA. He is currently Oxford-Princeton postdoctoral fellow in global governance.

Alexi Gugushvili

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Published

2013-07-22

Issue

Section

Articles