SPATIAL INEQUITIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION ADMISSIONS IN GEORGIA: LIKELIHOOD OF CHOOSING AND GAINING ACCESS TO PRESTIGIOUS HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

Authors

  • Maia Chankseliani

Abstract

The paper draws upon the findings of a mixed-methods study on spatial disparities in higher educationaccess in Georgia. Examination of quantitative data on approximately 118,000 applicants, a purposivesample of households and policy-makers reveals geographic inequalities in university choice-making andstudent destinations. Multinomial logistic regression analysis of HE applicant first-choice HEIs, theirgeneral aptitude and residential origin shows that of two applicants with the same measured generalaptitude, an applicant from a mountainous village is approximately 12 times more likely to apply to a leastrather than a most prestigious HEI than an applicant from the capital. Qualitative evidence is used toexplicate some aspects of the complex process of HE choice-making. Applicants and their familiesconsider a number of factors like HEI location, cost of studies, prestige and availability of the desiredprogramme when applying to tertiary education and selecting HEIs. Large differences are observed inapplicant chances to enter prestigious HEIs by their residential origin. When controlling for prestige offirst-choice HEIs, applicant measured aptitude and an array of other variables, applicants frommountainous villages are almost 8 times more likely to gain access to a least rather than the mostprestigious HEI than applicants from the capital. International research shows that HEI quality is closelylinked with higher probability of graduation, greater access to postgraduate studies and higher wagepremium. It can be argued that rural students who apply and gain admission to less prestigious HEIs, maybenefit from tertiary education to a lesser extent than urban students

Author Biography

Maia Chankseliani


Dr. Maia Chankseliani is an international development professional with a doctorate from Cambridge University (UK) and a master's from Harvard University (USA). With ten years of experience in educational research, policy-making, teaching and leadership, she brings in technical expertise in quantitative and qualitative research as well as exceptional interpersonal and leadership skills.

Dr.Chankseliani is based at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance (SKOPE) at the University of Oxford. Her previous jobs with public, non-profit, and private organizations have involved design, implementation, and evaluation of various policies and programmes directed towards better quality and more equitable education provision in Georgia and internationally. Dr.Chankseliani served as a policy-maker at the Ministry of Education and Science of Georgia. At different times, she has undertaken consultancy assignments with the World Bank Institute, Cantabrigia Advisors, Education Development Center, International Initiative to End Child Labor, Public Policy and Management Institute.

Dr.Chankseliani's primary area of expertise is post-secondary education - workforce development/employability, higher education access, vocational excellence, adult education and training. She has been engaged with primary and secondary education-related projects on child labour in Ghana, public-private partnerships in Africa, teacher educators' professional development in Pakistan, civic education in Georgia, creative partnerships in England, and gender equality in Mozambique. She has also worked on issues of labour market research in Georgia and civil service modernization in Kazakhstan.

Downloads

Published

2013-07-22

Issue

Section

Articles