Connection of Sum Light Aeroions Concentration with Natural Gamma Radiation and Air Temperature in Western Georgia

Authors

  • A.G. Amiranashvili Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Mikheil Nodia Institute of Geophysics

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.48614/rrs120213298

Abstract

Results of investigation of connection of sum light aeroions concentration (N) with environmental gamma radiation (Γ) and air temperature (T) in western Georgia are presented.Simultaneous measurements of N, Γ and T were madeat 166 different points by using portable aeroions, gamma and temperature survey meters.The terrain height (H) varied from 6 to 1928 m above sea level.The statistical characteristics of the values ofN, Г and Thave been studied. In particular, the following results were obtained. Range of changes of investigation parameters is following: N – 450÷3100 sm-3, Γ - 40÷180 nSv/h, T - 10÷34 ˚C. Mean values: N –1898 sm-3, Γ - 80 nSv/h, T – 24.6 ˚C.Coefficient of linear correlation (R) of individual values of N with Г, T and H accordingly are: 0.08 (level of signification α=0.25), 0.30 (α<0.005) and 0.12 (α=0.10). It is absent correlation between Г and T.A multiple linear regression equation N with Г, T and H is obtained. In particular, the variability of the individual N values with the variability of other studied parameters within the variation range is as follows (166 different pointsof measurements): Г–6.9 %, T – 61.0 % and H – 47.1 %. Thus, the main factor in the variability of the content of light air ions in this case is not the ionizing effect of gamma radiation from the soil, but the air temperature (variability of radon emanation from the soil) and the height of the terrain (variability of cosmic radiation). Connection of the averaged values of N on the Г has the form of a linear function: N = 2.9228·Γ +
1671.2 (R = 0.96, α<0.005).

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Published

2021-12-20

How to Cite

Amiranashvili, A. (2021). Connection of Sum Light Aeroions Concentration with Natural Gamma Radiation and Air Temperature in Western Georgia. Radiobiology and Radiation Safety, 1(2), 37–42. https://doi.org/10.48614/rrs120213298